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Brendon Urie Talks New Panic! on the Disco Album, Trump’s ‘Evil’ Immigration Coverage

Regardless of the title of Panic! On the Disco’s newest album, “Pray for the Depraved,” frontman Brendon Urie insists he “can’t stand for ev...


Regardless of the title of Panic! On the Disco’s newest album, “Pray for the Depraved,” frontman Brendon Urie insists he “can’t stand for evil.” At iHeartRadio’s launch celebration for the brand new report, which dropped right now (June 22), Urie expressed his disgust for Donald Trump and his “zero tolerance” immigration coverage that cut up greater than 2,000 immigrant kids from their mother and father on the U.S. border.

“On a regular basis it’s like one other dumb piece of sh– factor that he simply did,” Urie instructed Selection. “Like this pimp sh– that he simply did the place he arrange the means to separate children and put them in detention facilities — in cages — like animals, after which signed the order and mentioned, ‘I did this. I removed it.’ It’s like, ‘No, motherf—er. You made the order.’ That’s evil — that’s precise evil.”

Urie is hardly the primary musician to denounce the president for his actions, however whereas he says he feels a duty to talk out towards injustice, a live performance stage isn’t essentially his venue of selection.

“What I’d relatively do is use music as an escape, clearly, however I believe it can be crucial, to a sure diploma, to make it recognized — to let it’s recognized the place I stand — as a result of I can’t stand for evil,” Urie mentioned. “I can’t abide; I can’t stand for it, and I’ll proceed to combat. And whether or not or not I exploit that in our present stays to be seen as a result of I’ve mentioned stuff prior to now, however I don’t essentially need to give Trump his time throughout my present for our followers. I need us to construct one thing extra lovely relatively than take away by having to speak about that jackhole. So there’s a sure diploma that I do need to be political, and I do need to have a stance on stuff, however I need to do it a sensible approach.”

So far as how he plans to take motion, Urie mentioned he intends to begin a fund to help causes he cares about, in addition to volunteer his time to group service efforts. In the course of the iHeartRadio launch live performance on Thursday, Urie stored his political feedback temporary, introducing the track “Women/Women/Boys” as his “f— you” to Trump. The track about bisexual relationships has been revered as an anthem for the LGBT group.

The political local weather additionally performed a job in creating “Pray for the Depraved,” which represents two years of each societal and private modifications for Urie since Panic!’s final album, “Demise of a Bachelor” dropped in 2016. In that point, a brand new president was elected, and Urie accomplished a stint on Broadway starring in “Kinky Boots,” which he mentioned had a major affect on the sound of “Pray for the Depraved.”

Throughout his eight-shows-a-week Broadway schedule, Urie used his downtime between double-header performances to arrange his laptop computer, recorder and acoustic guitar, placing down beats and crafting new lyrics whereas Netflix performed within the background. Since he accomplished his time on the Broadway stage in August 2017, the singer mentioned the expertise has additionally reshaped him as a performer.

“It modified it so drastically that I don’t even suppose I observed it,” Urie mentioned. “I find yourself onstage now, and I really feel extra comfy than I’ve, however after I watch movies of us from the final six months of one-off reveals, it’s bizarre in a great way. I have a look at myself, and I’m going, ‘I don’t acknowledge me ever trying like that onstage, however that’s cool.’ I’ve a unique vibe about me, like I’ve been meditating with crystals or one thing — like I’ve been cleansed or one thing.”

As a lot as it’s impressed by new developments, Urie mentioned “Pray for the Depraved” can also be a mirrored image, partially, on the band’s and his maintained success for greater than 13 years since “I Write Sins, Not Tragedies” put them on the musical map.

“How did I get right here? Why am I nonetheless right here? It may well’t be simply me,” Urie mentioned. “Being eight-years-old and making cardboard cutouts of guitars and placing yarn round it and standing in entrance of the mirror simply singing no matter songs on the time — dreaming of it — to being right here now. A whole lot of it touches on that.”

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